Homes of Distinction Realty



Posted by Homes of Distinction Realty on 5/7/2020

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

When you're considering buying real estate as an investment, it's a good idea to weigh the pros and cons. That's especially important with "subject-to" real estate, because there can be risks and rewards with this type of property that are different from traditional purchases. Here's what you should be considering, before you decide on this investment strategy.

The Pros of "Subject-To" Real Estate  

On the "pro" side of buying "subject-to" real estate is the way you can acquire multiple properties for your portfolio. Additional benefits include:

  • There's no need to get a mortgage in your name, so you won't be overextending your credit or finances.
  • You avoid a lot of the transaction fees that come with getting a mortgage and buying a property.
  • You can close on the property quickly, and you'll pay fewer title company fees in the process.
  • You can buy as many properties as you want, as fast as you want, and all you have to do is make the mortgage payments.
  • You'll be helping sellers who are facing foreclosure or otherwise need to get out from under their house payments.
  • The Cons of "Subject-To" Real Estate  

    With any real estate transaction or investment of any kind, there are cons that come along with the pros. When you weigh them carefully, here's what you should be thinking about:

  • If the seller files bankruptcy, the original lender could foreclose on the property and you may lose your investment.
  • The lender could exercise their "due on sale clause," and require that the current mortgage balance be paid in full.
  • The deed could be tainted in some way, and without title insurance in your name you might not be protected.
  • You may end up spending money on an attorney if something goes wrong during the process.
  • Technically, the bank still owns the home because there's a mortgage on it.
  • Why Choose This Type of Real Estate Investment?

    If you don't have the money or credit to buy investment properties, buying "subject-to" can be a good choice if you understand and mitigate the risks. You may also want to choose this option if you're trying to acquire a lot of properties quickly, and you want to save money over traditional purchasing options. For people who buy "subject-to", there can be big opportunities to buy quality properties they might not be able to afford under typical circumstances.

    But it's very important that you're aware of the risks and legalities. Getting an attorney to help you with the first few properties, and to collect and make the mortgage payments on all the properties you buy, can be one of the ways you can make this type of transaction safer and better for you and the seller.




    Tags: mortgage   Investment   home loan  
    Categories: Uncategorized  


    Posted by Homes of Distinction Realty on 4/16/2020

    Image by Mediamodifier from Pixabay

    Although most people think of real estate investments in terms of real property that they can see and touch, buy and sell, or rent and manage on their own, there is a popular form of real estate investment that is not as personal and interactive.

    In many ways, it is easier, featuring the expectation of a steady, long-term income stream, and requiring less cash, almost no worry, and little concentrated effort. Buying shares in a real estate investment trust (REIT) is one way to create a diversified investment portfolio, and such investment opportunities are now widely available even to those with limited cash reserves and minimal investment expertise.

    Instead of holding the deed to a specific piece of property, an investor in an REIT holds shares in a corporate entity that operates under strict guidelines established by the Internal Revenue Service. The law that governs such investment was actually passed in 1960. Today, it is estimated that about 80 million Americans own shares in the hundreds of REITs that are publicly traded through the SEC or offered privately by brokers and financial advisers. In recent years, there has been substantial growth in REIT investment through pension and retirement plans.

    For the individual investor considering REIT investment, there are some cautions as well as some decided advantages. 

    Advantages of REITs

    First, on the plus side, a relatively small investment is required. Buying individual properties either to rent or for resale typically requires a substantial cash outlay, but REIT investment can begin with little cash outlay. This may be the prime advantage. Because one of the regulatory provisions limits major shareholder presence in any REIT, there is a great deal of opportunity for small investors.

    Additional advantages include:

    • Liquidity: Particularly with publicly-traded REITs, buying and selling is as easy as contacting a licensed broker and issuing the order.
    • Steady Income Stream: REITs are required to return 90% of taxable income to investors each year, in the form of dividends.
    • Regulation & Transparency: Corporations operate under strict governance, and must be managed by trustees or a board of directors.
    • Beneficial Risk-adjusted Return: With initial due diligence, the risk of loss over the long-term is very low.

    Possible Disadvantages

    • Minimal Growth: The possibility of capital appreciation is less than that of other investment types.
    • Tax Consequences: REIT Dividends are taxed as normal income under IRS rules.
    • Market Risk: All real estate value is market driven, and REIT's are no different. Investors should be aware of current trends, and take those into account when comparing various REITs. Certain segments are perennial high performers, while others are location and use-driven.
    • Associated Fees: Pay attention to management and transaction fees, not only those charged by investment brokers, but also the operating expenses of the REIT itself.

    Investment decisions should always be made following due diligence, and with personal goals and objectives in mind. But for investors who wish to get into the business of real estate investing, even on a limited basis, REITs can be a first step.




    Tags: investing   Investment   Finance  
    Categories: Uncategorized